The 5th Annual Humanities and Social Sciences Conference

“Making Strangers: Outsiders, Aliens and Foreigners”

Saturday, April 1, 2017 Lincoln University Conference

“Digitizing Lived Experience: Strangeness in Teaching and Learning”

Mass Com Panel Title & Rationale: Panel at 10:30-11:50 Grim 308

This panel features digital lived experiences of “outsider,” foreign,” and “alien” in the context of teaching and learning.

Presenters:

Nicole Files-Thompson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Mass Communication, Lincoln University

Heshvah Gladden, Class of 2016, Department of Mass Communication, Lincoln University

Tasha Saint-Louis, Class of 2017, Department of Mass Communication, Lincoln University

Constance Ebienfa, Class of 2017, Department of Mass Communication, Lincoln University

Nicole Files-Thompson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor & Interim Chair Department of Mass Communication, Immediate past Chair of African American Communication & Culture, National Communication Association will begin with a digital lesson plan on the construction of strangeness in media to maintain western cultural hegemony and foreign policy. She’ll be using Said’s orientalism as a starting point of the lesson as it focuses on the production of orientalism in Hollywood films, news reports, and Disney. Students tackle incongruence when “the orient is written about” with a counter narrative; the 2004 Iranian film “Turtles Can Fly”.

Heshvah Gladden, a recipient of the Excellence in Multimedia Editing award, will discuss a documentary that takes its focus on the lived experience of a Black Jewish woman as an outsider. It explores how her body and identity are strange within both communities, and illuminates Black people that practice Judaism as outsiders within globally.

The following two digital stories focus on the negotiation of identity at the intersections of race and nationality for two students studying abroad:

Tasha Saint-Louis, a recipient of the Outstanding Research in Mass Communication Award, focuses on the experience of an African American student studying in Spain and the foreignness of Black and American in her cultural exchange.

Constance Ebienfa focuses on the identity negotiation of a Nigerian student. It problematizes the supposition of implicit diversity and inclusion at HBCUs and the homogeneity of “Blackness.”

 

Opening Keynote Address 9:00am -10:20am Grim 313

“The ‘Other as an Identity: A Discourse on Fear and Social Rejection”

Ohiro Oni-Eseleh Adelphi University School of Social Work, New York

Closing Key Note Address 4:20-5pm Grim 313

“Making and Un-Making Strangers: Frances Trollope and the Power of Inclusion”

Marilyn D. Button CHAIR AND PROFESSOR, ENGLISH PROGRAM, DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

A Special Thanks to…

Conference Organizers

Abbes Maazaouil Ph.D., PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE , Editor of the Lincoln Humanities Journal

MARIA CHARLE POZA PH.D. ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

 

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