Tuesday, November 30

Tag: LUview

Study Abroad: Attaining a wider perspective
LU Travel, Study Abroad, Views from the U

Study Abroad: Attaining a wider perspective

by Jamila Jacob   The ability to travel, both domestically and internationally, is one of the greatest privileges a human could have. Traveling, especially internationally is one of the most sought after and costliest leisure activities to exist. A great benefit to attending college, apart from having access to higher education, is having study abroad opportunities at one’s disposal. In fact, many students’ first travel experience might have been through a study abroad program at their institution. At Lincoln University of Pennsylvania, though a relatively small institution, there are countless opportunities to travel abroad to pursue college courses. Students have been to a variety of continents where they have visited countries like South Africa, Kenya, Spain, China, Ir...
Black History Month: Making your own story.
Campus News, Views from the U

Black History Month: Making your own story.

  It has been about a week since the month of February has begun. The first day of the month was not treated like any ordinary day by many. While the morning air on LU’s campus was visibly freezing, the souls of our colleagues were filled with warmth. From brightly colored dashikis, to afro hair in bloom like on a fresh day of spring, the campus community oozed with pride and vibrant energy: Black History Month! However, that excitement has seemed to wane a bit. The semester is rolling by and workloads seem to weigh a lot more than they did merely two weeks ago. All the same, we need to retain the same energy we had on the first day of February. While 28 days are not enough to recognize our achievements, each celebrated element of black history should serve to inspire our pur...
Student Spotlight: Lamar Mcmillan
Views from the U

Student Spotlight: Lamar Mcmillan

By: Sandra Glover Lamar McMillan is currently a freshman here at Lincoln University he is originally from Prince Georges county, Maryland. McMillan started his journey of writing poetry for over one year, he became inspired to start writing because of someone he cared affectionately for. This will be a debut piece of poetry that is meant to be read as a 4 part story. Check it out! Poetry
Life At Sea: Japan is #Woke
LU Travel, Study Abroad, Views from the U

Life At Sea: Japan is #Woke

  By Chanel Watson   Kobe seems like a beautiful place, but I will never actually know. As soon as the ship docked in Japan, I was on my flight to Tokyo. After taking a 12 day trip from Hawaii, I was ready to experience the New York City of Asia. As I got off my plane and hopped in the cab, you could easily feel the tension between them and me, the Black students and Asian locals. As we walked through the terminal to the taxis, I could feel the stares at my brown skin and jet black braids. I appreciate that Japanese people try to be discreet about their stares, but I knew that the last thing they expected to see during the day was a group of 7 Black students. When we got out of the airport, Tokyo was everything I had seen in the movies. Bright lights, Japanese ...
Life at Sea: Curry, Chaos and Curiosity in India
LU Travel, Study Abroad, Views from the U

Life at Sea: Curry, Chaos and Curiosity in India

  By Chanel Watson I have had 5 adventurous days in a country that triggers all 5 of your senses. Imagine the smell of spices and tastes of curry; colorful saris and marble art are the cultural attractions that catch your eye. Rub the genie lamps with the tips of your fingers while listening to the traditional Indian music through their string and percussion instruments. Welcome to India. My trip started by going on a field program with my International Marketing class. We visited the Namami Wellness Resort in Kochi which is considered a getaway for people trying to find peace and serenity. We were welcomed with flowers and coconut milk, and then taken through a beautiful garden that leads to a shrine. In Hinduism, they worship Dhanwanthari, an avatar of Vishnu, to pra...
Why Moonlight’s Win is So Important
Pop Culture/Lifestyle, Views from the U

Why Moonlight’s Win is So Important

By Tasha Saint-Louis On February 26th at the 89th Annual Academy Awards, Moonlight made history as the first LGBTQ film and film with an all-black cast to win an Oscar for best picture. This came in good time as Black History Month was ending and other historical achievements were made—Viola Davis became the first African-American woman to win an Emmy, Tony, and Oscar while Mahershala Ali made history as the first Muslim to win an Oscar. In addition to best picture and best supporting actor, the film won an Oscar for best adapted screenplay but their wins are not limited to the Academy. A refreshing take on the experiences of young Black boy’s coming of age and self-acceptance as a gay man, Moonlight has won countless other awards—183 others to be exact. The reason why winning...
The 6th Man Has Spirit, What About You?
Campus News, Sports, Views from the U

The 6th Man Has Spirit, What About You?

By: Tasha Saint-Louis If you have attended any recent sports events on Lincoln’s campus, you’ll notice that there is a new dynamic to the student section. Next to the band, you will see a sea of orange and blue chanting, jumping, and cheering more than the rest. What sets them apart from the rest of the students? A little something called school spirit. A newly formed organization on campus, The 6th Man is more than just a section; it represents a change in the game experience on campus. Per the organization’s adviser, Tiffani Brown, “The 6th Man is [essentially] a spirit campaign designed to shift the overall culture here at Lincoln.” The organization’s president Kenneth Faulcon, knew that the organization’s introduction to the campus would work best during basketball se...
Campus Sit-In
Campus News, News & Current Affairs, Views from the U

Campus Sit-In

By Alana Hudson On Sept. 28 students of the Lincoln University sat in the cafe after operation hours protesting against the administration and the athletic programs. This one day protest made it known to the rest of the local community where NBC felt the need to report it. Has the administration responded to the students out cry? As a student, I failed to see changes from the university management team. I also can blame my peers for not standing long and hard for what they believe needed to be fixed so we can have a successful college career. This act can be related to a hurt child crying behind a glass door. Where it was noticeable but not distinctive enough to make an impact at The Lincoln University. With the timeliness of the black lives matter protesting for rights [regardle...
One Month Later and Still No Grade
Campus Academic Affairs, Views from the U

One Month Later and Still No Grade

by Trejha Whitfield “We took the test last week, when will I see my grade?” After four years in college I am still asking this question. According to The Lincoln University’s Academic Calendar for the 2016-2017 school year, midterm grades for the fall semester were to be submitted on October 10. Many students have taken their exams between October 3 and the 7; also listed on the University’s Academic Calendar as Midterm Week. "It's good to see my grades and gauge where I am, if I should work harder or stay consistent," says Elisha Hall, a transfer junior at The Lincoln University. As a rising senior Hall is concerned with how well she is doing in two out of the five classes she is registered for. The anticipation of waiting for midterm grades has brought students into an up...
Series: My Semester at Sea
LU Travel, Study Abroad, Views from the U

Series: My Semester at Sea

Series: My Semester at Sea I think I Found Home By Chanel Watson During the pre-port before we dock in Dakar, Senegal you can feel the tension in the room because everyone doesn’t know what to expect. This is the first time “Semester at Sea” has ever taken students to Senegal, and not a lot of professors have traveled there before. Everyone would get off the boat uncertain of the area and the behavior of the people. However, one thing was certain among the Black students; this would be the country that we come face to face with our past. As soon as we got past the gate from the port, we were bombarded with Africans trying to greet us and become our tour guides. These people have never seen me, but when they saw my skin color they greeted me saying “Welcome my sister.” Because w...